Archive for the ‘spending’ Category


The Spending Battle’s Winners and Losers

Dec15

By John Feehery

Obama meets with Congressional Leadership July 2011.jpg

“Obama meets with Congressional Leadership July 2011″ by Official White House Photo by Pete Souza – http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and-video/photogallery/debt-and-deficit-negotiations (Photograph 4 of 20). Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.


(This originally appeared in the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank)

So, now that we have dispensed with the “cromnibus,” who won and who lost in the latest budget battle?  Here are my picks:

Winners:

*The House Appropriations Committee:  The committee members reasserted their relevance, beating the conventional wisdom through hard work and grit. Most people thought that Congress’s spending committee would be forced to punt until next year, but Chairman Hal Rogers did not take no for an answer and got 11 of the 12 annual bills passed in one big bill. (more…)

Taming the Wild West of Campaign Spending

Dec13

By John Feehery

Capitol at Dusk 2.jpg

“Capitol at Dusk 2″ by Martin Falbisoner – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

(This originally appeared in the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank)

Over the objections of then-House Speaker Dennis Hastert (my former boss) and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President George W. Bush signed into law the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002.

And with that singular act, President Bush dealt a crippling blow to the power of political parties.

Better known to history as McCain-Feingold, the BCRA banned so-called soft money donations to the Republican and Democratic parties. The law was constitutionally suspect from the get-go and a subsequent Supreme Court ruling found that anybody could spend any amount of money advocating whatever they wanted to advocate, but that it was still constitutional to limit the amount of money channeled to formal political parties. (more…)

How the GOP Gains From Focusing on Spending Now and Immigration Later

Dec5

By John Feehery

United States Capitol building under renovation November 2014 photo D Ramey Logan.jpg

“United States Capitol building under renovation November 2014 photo D Ramey Logan” by WPPilot – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

(This originally appeared in the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank)

Amid tension over funding the government past next week’s deadline, Congress has invented a term that brings back memories of the 2012 losing Republican presidential nominee–for no reason other than it rhymes with his last name.

What do you get if you combine a short-term continuing resolution with a long-term omnibus spending bill? (more…)

An Omni is Better Than A Short-Term CR

Nov25

By John Feehery

United States Capitol west front edit2.jpg

“United States Capitol west front edit2″ by United_States_Capitol_-_west_front.jpg: Architect of the Capitol
derivative work: O.J. – United_States_Capitol_-_west_front.jpg. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

(This originally appeared in the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank)

Should Congress pass an omnibus appropriations bill or a series of short-term continuing resolutions?

An omnibus appropriations bill, or “omni,” in Hill-speak, is an amalgamation of the 12 regular spending bills, rolled up into one.

Congress passes an omni when it can’t get its work done in regular order. (more…)

Playing Politics With Ebola

Oct14

By John Feehery

President Barack Obama.jpg

“President Barack Obama” by Official White House Photo by Pete Souza – P120612PS-0463 (direct link). Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The Democrats are trying to tie Ebola to the Republicans.

This is a political season so this is not surprising. (more…)

 

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