John Feehery: Speaking Engagements

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Posted on December 7, 2008


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  Voters in Louisiana and Georgia have given a big thumbs down to one-party Democratic government in the last week.


 


  In Georgia, Senator Saxby Chambliss easily routed his Democratic opponent Jim Martin by twenty points.  Low African-American turnout was blamed, although President-elect Barack Obama sent his campaign staff and personally made phone calls to unseat the Republican.


 


  In Louisiana, there was further grim news for the Democratic majority.  In the 2nd Congressional District, which includes most of New Orleans, Republican attorney Anh "Joseph" Cao won 50 percent of the vote to indicted Congressman William Jefferson's 47 percent and will become the first Vietnamese-American in Congress.  This was a real surprise in an overwhelmingly black district.   In the 4th Congressional District in western Louisiana, Republican John Fleming squeaked past Democrat Paul Carmouche in the race to replace retiring 10-term Rep. Jim McCrery, R-La. Only a few hundred votes separated the two.


 


  When a party is on a roll, it wins these seats.  Last year, House Democrats swept three special elections, and which gave momentum going into the November elections.


 


  Clearly, there is a reaction to one-party rule.  While it is hard to conclude that these elections represent a repudiation of President-elect Obama, you can make the case that these election represent a repudiation of the idea that Obama should get a blank check.


 


  The election in the 2nd District of Louisiana is especially interesting. That African-American voters either ignored or were indifferent to both the Republican’s political affiliation and race is a good sign for the GOP’s future.  If they can continue to make inroads into the Asian community, they can put a whole new spin on the stereotype of the typical Republican.  With Bobby Jindal as Governor, and Joseph Cao as the newest member of the House, Louisiana is signaling that it tired of typical Democratic corruption that has bedeviled that state for generations.  It’s about time.  I wonder if that message can be exported to Chicago.


 


  All in all, these last three elections have given the GOP some sorely needed good news.  



 


  Voters in Louisiana and Georgia have given a big thumbs down to one-party Democratic government in the last week.


 


  In Georgia, Senator Saxby Chambliss easily routed his Democratic opponent Jim Martin by twenty points.  Low African-American turnout was blamed, although President-elect Barack Obama sent his campaign staff and personally made phone calls to unseat the Republican.


 


  In Louisiana, there was further grim news for the Democratic majority.  In the 2nd Congressional District, which includes most of New Orleans, Republican attorney Anh "Joseph" Cao won 50 percent of the vote to indicted Congressman William Jefferson's 47 percent and will become the first Vietnamese-American in Congress.  This was a real surprise in an overwhelmingly black district.   In the 4th Congressional District in western Louisiana, Republican John Fleming squeaked past Democrat Paul Carmouche in the race to replace retiring 10-term Rep. Jim McCrery, R-La. Only a few hundred votes separated the two.


 


  When a party is on a roll, it wins these seats.  Last year, House Democrats swept three special elections, and which gave momentum going into the November elections.


 


  Clearly, there is a reaction to one-party rule.  While it is hard to conclude that these elections represent a repudiation of President-elect Obama, you can make the case that these election represent a repudiation of the idea that Obama should get a blank check.


 


  The election in the 2nd District of Louisiana is especially interesting. That African-American voters either ignored or were indifferent to both the Republican’s political affiliation and race is a good sign for the GOP’s future.  If they can continue to make inroads into the Asian community, they can put a whole new spin on the stereotype of the typical Republican.  With Bobby Jindal as Governor, and Joseph Cao as the newest member of the House, Louisiana is signaling that it tired of typical Democratic corruption that has bedeviled that state for generations.  It’s about time.  I wonder if that message can be exported to Chicago.


 


  All in all, these last three elections have given the GOP some sorely needed good news.